Author: Rachel

Nestled along Rowell Road (between Little India and Jalan Besar) is Sideways Singapore, a wood-fired dining concept that does both brunch and dinner. I was recently invited by Sideways Singapore to try out their new menu, but ended up learning more about their restaurant and the awesome people behind it.

Sideways Singapore is a recently opened, sister food establishment to The Hangar. It’s currently housed in a refurbished 100 year old shophouse.

Unbelievably, the restaurant is just under 6 months old but it is already full of character. The chairs, tables, wiring, pretty much everything was put together by Singaporean Pav, who co-owns Sideways Singapore with his Italian partner, Giulia.

When we spoke with Pav and Giulia, they both seemed to really love living in Singapore (having lived overseas), and they both hoped to create something special and unique for Singapore.

As for the menu, almost everything is cooked in a beautiful wood-fire oven, which was lovingly made from scratch by Pav.

He shared with us that it took him 3.5 weeks to finish building this oven, and I was really impressed by his ability to pick up these skills and to be able to make his very own oven!

The ambience at Sideways Singapore is very welcoming, almost warm and homely, there’s lots of natural ambient light that filters in in the day time. And I hear that Sideways Singapore is even more magical at night, so I’ll have to come again.

I like the attention to detail everywhere, and the beautiful tiles on the flooring provide a reflection of the 100 year old shophouse’s Singaporean heritage.

Even the outdoor washroom round the back has its own unique charm 🙂

Don’t forget to check out the exposed exterior wall of the shophouse, which is covered in a beautiful, almost 3D-esque street art created by two American graffiti artists back in 2010.

Before I forget, let me tell you about the food!

First, we tried their delicious signature wood-fired sourdough [$4+].

The bread served at Sideways is made fresh daily.

They do sourdough, ciabatta, everything! So if you want to buy a loaf, do give them a call in advance (I’ve listed their telephone number at the end of this post).

The wood-fired sourdough was definitely one of the best sourdoughs I’ve had in Singapore. It’s really unforgettable.

Really airy, crispy, fresh, soft and fluffy in the centre! A must-order at Sideways. The portion was generous/just nice for me, and we had it with an avo pesto dip [$9+] made from feta, pesto, basil, tamarind, olive oil, pepper and mint. Really good, savoury stuff and so easy to spread on the sourdough. I’m craving it just thinking about it. It’s really tasty.

Next, I tried the Sicilian Crostini [$12+] which is spicy nduja spread, creamy burrata with mint served on wood-fired sourdough toast.

This is one of their mains. It’s really hearty, filling and full of flavour. If you’re a big eater, order this. The sides of the sourdough was really gorgeously charred and crusty! Taste-wise, I found that the dishes we tried all had a commonality among one another, I think it lies in the use of mint, basil and pepper that gives the food at Sideways its own original character. We found it hard to label the cuisine at Sideways – it seems to be a melting pot of different influences, that comes together to form its own sort of identity. I wouldn’t say it falls under fusion per se, but it is a mixture of different food cultures.

Next, we tried the oven baked artichoke. On its own, we found it pretty vinegary and tasted quite pickled. I felt like it could pair nicely with a drink, or maybe couscous? Perhaps pita? I’m not sure what people generally eat artichoke with, I usually have it on pizza. Besides artichoke done this style, Sideways also does a fried version, which actually sounds pretty good..

After that, we tried something new on their menu – Stuffed Pita with Veg [$16+]. This is their wood-fired pita filled with eggplant, peppers, pesto, melted mozzarella and sprinkled with parsley. It’s a little like a calzone, and tastes similar to the other items we tried! I think this is worth ordering if you are craving something very homely and easy to eat. I suspect that this stuffed pita with veg would be a hit with children.

Last but not least, we tried the Cauliflower Steak [$12+].

The cauliflower is cooked in the wood-fire oven and has a nice, lightly charred flavour. The cauliflower is topped with a beautiful beetroot tahini and lots of sesame, pepper and parsley. The tahini has a rich and wonderful sesame flavour, and the tiny cubes of beetroot were delicious – very fresh and floral and not at all earthy or muddy tasting. Again, the flavours in the tahini were rich and yummy.

I think the successful dishes which really worked at Sideways were those with a mix of more plain, light flavours combined with more richer, more intense flavours to balance it out. I particularly liked the signature wood-fired sourdough. Highly recommend it, together with the avo pesto dip. Also recommend the new cauliflower steak with beetroot tahini. It’s super good.

Who I think would enjoy Sideways Singapore:

– People who love cafe hopping and finding new restaurants in Singapore;

– Vegetarians and vegans as the menu is pretty veg friendly;

– Anyone who feels ambience is very important in a dining setting;

– Anyone who LOVES bread;

– Anyone who loves tapas, small plates, appetisers, hummus, tahini, etc;

– Anyone who likes oven baked fish, lamb, veg;

– Anyone who likes fusion / a variety of different food cultures; and

– Anyone who is bored of what Singapore has to offer and wants an escape from the Central Business District and crowds in the shopping malls.

Sideways Singapore is truly a new experience, both visually and food-wise! It really felt like travelling to a different part of Singapore I’ve not seen before.

To end this post, I want to thank both Giulia and Pav for hosting us and letting us try their delicious food as well as explore their beautiful wood-fired restaurant.

It’s certainly worth a visit and if you are in the neighbourhood, make sure you don’t miss it! And be sure to try all of their yummy wood-fired food and let me know if you enjoyed it 🙂

Address: Sideways Singapore,

109 Rowell Road,

Singapore 208033

Tel: 6291 3441

Website: www.sideways.com.sg

Instagram: @sidewayssg

Opens on Tuesdays to Sundays

Tuesdays to Fridays: 11.30am – 11pm

Saturdays: 10am – 11pm

Sundays: 10am – 4pm

Woke up this morning craving pasta so the first order of business was a trip to Tipo Singapore, a newly opened, Halal pasta bar in the Bugis/Kampong Glam area.

Tipo was a 10-15 minute walk from Bugis MRT Station. We were greeted by a gorgeous teal and pink coloured shopfront with lots of fresh, homemade pasta in the front window.

Even though we had arrived at 12.25pm, there were plenty of customers seated and eating lunch! The menu was pretty easy to read. There were two pasta options to choose from and various sauces. The lunch set is pretty worth it, you get a bowl of pasta and a homemade iced tea for $9.90.

There’s also a Build Your Own Pasta menu. One of the toppings Tipo have is black caviar! So fancy 🙂

My brother ordered the carbonara al funghi and I had the ragu alla bolognese.

Carbonara al Funghi with Iced Tea [$9.90]

Pasta, alfredo, mushroom and a sous vide egg

The carbonara was very creamy and eggy. I’m not really a carbonara fan, so can’t comment. But my brother polished the plate clean, no complaints.

Ragu Alla Bolognese with Iced Tea [$9.90]

Pasta, raghu, parmesan

Yum. My pasta dish was pretty delicious! I love how the ragu bolognese sauce went so well with the pasta. The beef was very nice, soft and tender. Think it was beef cheek. The pasta itself wasn’t too wet or dry. My brother found the pasta too salty but I thought it was okay. I thought the sauce to pasta ratio was perfect. I think the only improvement would be if the pasta had flavourful herbs like rosemary in to it, to give it more of a depth.

On the whole, it was pretty good pasta but not the most amazing pasta I’ve had. Because it was a little inconvenient to get to, I’ld probably only head to Tipo to eat if I was in the Kampong Glam area.

Tipo Singapore

785 North Bridge Road,

Singapore 198753

www.tipo.sg

At the start of the year (2018), I challenged myself to read 15 books and had by the beginning of December completed my goal. It’s surprising because I’ve not been able to finish my reading challenges in previous years – this year I had to finish 1.25 books per month. Sounds a little tough but it is totally doable!

I think I had more time this year in comparison to the past few years where I was adjusting to work life and also studying for my Bar exams. So I had other important things going on in my life that I had to prioritise.

This year marked the end of exam taking probably for the rest of my life. So I could dedicate the extra time to reading books instead of studying the law. There is a certain comfort in the written word, immersing yourself in the mind of another human being, like soaking in a nice warm bath and just momentarily forgetting the troubles of your own life. Kind of like how listening to someone else talk is a real comfort instead of drowning in your own never-ending thoughts.

I decided to jot down a quick one liner reviews of the 15 books I read this year before I forget, ‘cos I’ve already forgotten some of the books which I read in 2018. Fortunately I have it all tracked on my goodreads account so I can refer to it in future. It’s really useful, and I highly recommend using goodreads for reading detailed book reviews as well as curating your reading list.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy my mini book review below! (Please feel free to let me know in the comments section what books you’ve read this year and which ones were your favourite!)

1. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro

This was quite a difficult and long-winded read, even though the story takes place over three days, the book is a mammoth five hundred pages (!!!) and it follows the protagonist, Ryder, who is a famous pianist who has arrived in a European city for his concert; Ryder finds himself stuck in a weird world where everything goes wrong and throughout the book he is moving through a ghost-like fog where he has no control over what goes on.

2. The Beauty Myth: How Images are Used Against Women by Naomi Wolf

I found this book a little too narrowly focused, archaic and academic in style for my personal tastes, but it’s not too bad; it goes deep into how images of women in patriarchal society are used as a weapon against women to create a sexualised idea of how women should behave and look like, and interestingly enough, this feminist author was formerly the political advisor to Bill Clinton and Al Gore.

3. An Artist of the Floating World by Kazuo Ishiguro

Ishiguro is a British Japanese writer so he provides an interesting perspective – having traditional Japanese parents while growing up in England – in this book he presents a very Japanese literature style (I think quite different from his usual writing style), the book transports the reader to post-war Japan and zooms in on the life of an elderly Japanese artist and his children’s young family, the book is something like a bildungsroman but from the perspective of an old retired man.

4. The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens

If you enjoy reading about tax havens, The Panama Papers, and white collar crime, you’ll enjoy this quite short but very insightful and interesting non-fiction book; this translated work covers the history of tax havens, how they came about and provides meaningful recommendations on how the world can fight back and stop individuals from hiding behind shell companies and start paying their taxes.

5. The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

To be honest I started this classic perhaps last year or the year before, it’s a really really long book (more than 1,000 pages), and it’s the first novel ever written in the history of humankind (and written by a woman too!), this dramatic tome follows the life and death of Genji (the son of an Emperor) and his dalliances, and shows us what court life was like during the Heian period, it’s truly like Japanese theatre in beautiful written form, it’s also pretty well translated.

6. Hard Choices by Hillary Rodham Clinton

Needless to say, all politicians are great at talking, but this book focuses on Hillary’s work as Secretary of State during the Obama administration and the tough calls she had to make, dealing with difficult and precarious situations, people, countries, personally I found that it makes for both an exciting and boring read at times, would be a good read for those with a keen interest in politics and diplomacy.

7. The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple by Jeff Guinn

Possibly my favourite book that I’ve read this year, Jeff Guinn and his team make amazingly detailed biographers and storytellers, and so much research has gone into this work, it’s truly a work of art, I highly recommend this book, it delves really deep into the history of Jim Jones and the Jonestown cult.

8. Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

I was extremely motivated to finish this book before the movie, and I’ll say the movie is quite close to the book, like a condensed version, but the book has a very very different type of humour to it, it’s super easy to read, lots of cliffhangers, like chick lit to be honest, and I did enjoy seeing all the Singaporean references like ACS and CHIJ, etc, and on some level could relate in the sense that I knew people who lived lives similar to that of the characters in the book, while reading this I did wonder to myself, whether Kevin Kwan wanted the reader to question whether capitalism is wrong, wrong, wrong, perhaps…

9. The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less by Barry Schwartz

This book really captured my attention, it’s super easy to read and even though it was written in the early 2000s, it still remains super relevant, it’s a self-help book of sorts, it makes you question why we need to make so many choices each day, and how our lives are more stressful and depressing because of all the choices, I found myself agreeing and disagreeing on some aspects, I think at the end of the day it is something like an opinion piece…

10. Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman

OITNB is also another book turned into a show, to be honest, the book feels more realistic but it is also kind of “pat on the back”, self-congratulatory, written from a very privileged perspective, I think I enjoy the show a lot more, as it develops the stories of different characters, and focuses less on Pipes and her first world problems, this book was surprisingly short and easy to read, it was a little annoying how she would throw in unnecessarily big words from time to time, but to sum it up, I enjoyed the show more.

11. This is What Inequality Looks Like by Teo You Yenn

This book of essays is written in a very Americanised way, like for an American audience to understand the lives of Singapore poor, something of the opposite of Crazy Rich Asians, funny how the CRA movie came out in the same year as this book, but like OITNB, this book is written from the position of someone who is both quite privileged and educated, I found myself nodding most of the way but towards the end, I was kind of disappointed that she did not go into racism in Singapore and instead kind of sat on the fence about it, I guess it’s quite a taboo topic that’s not safe to discuss, especially in written form, nevertheless, this was an enjoyable, eye-opening, introductory book that confronts poverty in Singapore head on, fearlessly; I look forward to reading her future works.

12. We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Didn’t have this in my photo above because it’s on loan to a friend, but this is another very tiny book on feminism (I subscribe to the view that feminism is for everyone and benefits everyone in society, female, male, etc), it’s essentially the TED Talk (which has millions of views by the way) in book form, I really enjoyed it, it’s a refreshing read and I highly recommend getting this book for yourself or others as a gift, or watching the original TED Talk, it’s truly enlightening and very light-hearted but also ever so slightly serious in a good, relatable way.

13. Ayiti by Roxane Gay

A short, unpretentious, very blunt and very fearlessly real book, Ayiti is an easy to read but maybe harder to digest collection of short stories that follows the struggles and successes of various Haitian people.

14. Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Took me a while to finish this book, but she’s an amazing storyteller, weaving multiple stories into one story with a happy ending, I quite loved it, it was just a little long, sarcastic and repetitive at times, but it isn’t too bad, it is quite funny and real at times, it’s essentially about various people from different parts of Africa moving overseas and their changing, intermingling lives.

15. Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami

This book was quite disappointing, very repetitive, had some typos here and there, not really well edited or translated and it was super long at 700 pages or more, I suspect Murakami is past his prime, this isn’t his best work, felt like he was just writing because that’s his job and there’s a certain expectation when you’re famous, at times the book gets really weird, but it’s basically a mystery novel with an unexciting, easily forgettable artist as the male protagonist and some other boring, mysterious characters, if you’ve read Murakami’s earlier works, it’s very similar, just worse and badly edited.

Sometimes we just need a little juju. This delightful teal coloured space at the Visitor’s Services Kiosk at Singapore Botanic Gardens is the perfect pitstop after a long stroll through this 158 year old garden. (Fun fact: Did you know Singapore Botanic Gardens is one of three gardens to be honoured as a UNESCO World Heritage Site?)

Juju offers up a variety of both healthy and slightly indulgent snacks (think smoothies, acai bowls, croissants, coffee, tea and other tea break kind of food).

For most of the year, Singapore is pretty hot and humid so Juju offers patrons both refreshing thirst quenchers and a respite from the sun’s rays.

Midway through my walk today, I decided to visit Juju, which is conveniently located near the Bukit Timah entrance at the Visitors’ Services Kiosk. If you’re coming from the Bukit Timah entrance, just walk straight and look out for the Visitors’ Services sign. Turn left into the narrow path and walk along the wooden path, and Juju is right behind the Visitors’ Services Kiosk.

Note that Juju is more of a humble kiosk than a spacious cafe. There are benches where you can sit on and enjoy your drink or bowl but it is not a massive space.

I tried the refreshing Juju Acai Bowl in regular size (S$8.50). I believe they are currently using Selva Foods’ acai, which is why I decided to visit them in the first place! 🙂

The Juju Acai Bowl is made with acai, watermelon, other fruits, medjool dates and filtered water.

My bowl was topped with a coconut chia seed pudding-like sauce, blueberries, bananas and generous chunks of granola. There was also some kind of nut butter drizzled over it. Perhaps almond or peanut butter.

The frozen dessert had plenty of subtle watermelon flavour, some slight earthy acai flavour to it and towards the end, I could taste a hint of naturally sweet medjool dates.

The end result of this concoction was a very light, clean, healthy but still filling acai bowl. I felt much more alive after eating it, and it’s definitely pretty healthy and delicious in its own right. There are still many other things on their menu that I don’t mind trying next time. An alternative to the acai bowl is the red dragonfruit bowl which sounds incredibly interesting and looks so pretty! I also want to try out their colourful smoothies next.

Have you tried Juju at Singapore Botanic Gardens or any other restaurant/cafe there? Let me know in the comments whether you have, and what your food recommendations are!

It’s not every day that one goes to Brasserie Les Saveurs at The St. Regis Singapore for high tea 🙂

This afternoon, my parents and I took a trip down to town for our first high tea experience at the 6 star hotel’s contemporary French restaurant.

Perhaps what was most surprising was the price. It is relatively affordable when you compare the pricing of their afternoon tea set to other places in Singapore that offer high tea.

For high tea on a Sunday, it is S$53++ per person. It includes access to the buffet spread (sushi, fruit, patisserie, cheese, crepe, sorbet, etc), a three tier high tea set, and a pot of tea (lots of TWG options/The St. Regis tea blend).

On weekdays, the afternoon tea is slightly cheaper.

For S$36++ per person on a Sunday, you get to enjoy a pot of tea and a three tier high tea set, which is quite filling and delicious on its own. I highly recommend this one, and it’s what the three of us got.

The tier comes with one chocolate financier, one raisin scone, one plain scone, one madeleine, one foie gras sandwich, one smoked salmon blini, one lemon tart and one raspberry tart.

For the high tea at The St Regis Singapore, just note that there aren’t any ongoing card promotions. But you can still enjoy 50% off with Amex if two people dine for lunch or dinner (it excludes Sunday lunch as they do brunch instead). I recommend calling in advance to confirm as well as to make a reservation.

Another great thing is that there is complimentary parking, just remember to ask the host for it before leaving the hotel.

Because of the wonderfully relaxed atmosphere and quality, you will definitely get more bang for your buck at The St. Regis.

Just imagine reclining in your chair with a cup of tea in hand, while a pianist nearby serenades you with a rendition of La Vie en Rose and Beauty and the Beast.

And on the other side of the floor-to-ceiling windows, like a gentle geyser, a row of fountains steadily toss jets of water into the air. It is all very zen.

I love that the hotel itself is also full of vibrant Asian paintings and sculptures.

The attention to detail is everywhere.

In the women’s restroom was a beautiful and well-worn dark wooden console table.

Carved into its surface was a very picturesque and detailed image that seemed to tell a story. It showed a scenery as if from an elegant Chinese painting from a long ago dynasty.

All in all, the high tea experience at The St. Regis was wonderful. Although the clotted cream wasn’t as amazing as what you can get in the UK, I thoroughly enjoyed their scones! The raspberry and lemon tarts in the high tea were also very delectable and very well done indeed.

The St. Regis Singapore is such a nice hotel, I can’t wait to come back again for their quality high tea, as well as to try their lunch and dinner. And maybe a staycation (one day!)

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